12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: Step 2 – Responding to the Petition for Dissolution

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog will spell out the 12 steps of divorce.

In doing so, we will also track two divorcing couples making their way through the process.

Spoiler alert: Art and Angela Aingel take the high road. While divorce is not usually a fun process (I have yet to hear someone tell the judge at final orders, “Thank you, sir, may I have another?”), the Aingels have a relatively straightforward experience before moving forward with their separate lives. Meanwhile, Draco and Desdemona DeVille make choices that, while initially tempting, detour them down a bad road laden with unnecessary drama, painful court appearances and skyrocketing costs.

The following is a roadmap of the 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult. 12 Steps of Divorce - Andersen Law-2

  • January – serving and filing a petition for dissolution
  • February – responding to the petition
  • March – sworn financial statement, disclosures, and parenting classes
  • April – initial status conference
  • May – discovery and depositions
  • June – professionals:  CFI, PRE, vocational evaluator, appraisals
  • July – motions to compel and telephone conferences
  • August – temporary orders
  • September – mediation
  • October – parenting plans and separation agreements
  • November – witnesses, pretrial deadlines and permanent orders
  • December – QDROs and other post decree issues

FEBRUARY: “Now what? Responding to the Petition for Dissolution”

Former college buddies Art Aingel and Draco DeVille seemed to have less and less in common over the years — that is until they both found themselves on the receiving end of their respective wives’ divorce filings. Draco’s came first, so he was into the process sooner and had plenty of so-called “pointers” for his friend Art.  Continue reading “12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: Step 2 – Responding to the Petition for Dissolution”

12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: Step 4 – Going to Court – The Initial Status Conference

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog will spell out the 12 steps of divorce.

In doing so, we will also track two divorcing couples making their way through the process.

Spoiler alert: Art and Angela Aingel take the high road. While divorce is not usually a fun process (I have yet to hear someone tell the judge at final orders, “Thank you, sir, may I have another?”), 12 Steps of Divorce - Andersen Law-the Aingels have a relatively straightforward experience before moving forward with their separate lives. Meanwhile, Draco and Desdemona DeVille make choices that, while initially tempting, detour them down a bad road laden with unnecessary drama, painful court appearances and skyrocketing costs.

The following is a roadmap of the 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult.

Here are how we will cover the 12 steps of divorce:

January – serving and filing a petition for dissolution

February – responding to the petition

March – sworn financial statement, disclosures, and parenting classes

April: The Initial Status Conference Continue reading “12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: Step 4 – Going to Court – The Initial Status Conference”

12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: Step 9 – Mediation

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog is spelling out the 12 steps of divorce.

In doing so, we are also tracking two divorcing couples making their way through the process.

Spoiler alert: Art and Angela Aingel take the high road. While divorce is not usually a fun process (I have yet to hear someone tell the judge at final orders, “Thank you, sir, may I have another?”), the Aingels have a relatively straightforward experience before moving forward with their separate lives. Meanwhile, Draco and Desdemona DeVille make choices that, while initially tempting, detour them down a bad road laden with unnecessary drama, painful court appearances and skyrocketing costs. 12-steps-of-divorce-andersen-law-3-mediation

The following is a roadmap of the 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult.

Here are how we will cover the 12 steps of divorce:

January: serving and filing a petition for dissolution

February: responding to the petition

March: sworn financial statement, disclosures, and parenting classes

April: the initial status conference

May: discovery and depositions

June: hiring a CFI, PRE, vocational evaluator, real estate appraiser and other experts

July: motions to compel and telephone conferences

August: temporary orders

September – mediation

October – parenting plans and separation agreements

November – witnesses, pretrial deadlines and permanent orders

December – QDROs and other post decree issues

So let’s continue with September.

September: Getting to Yes: MEDIATION

Part One: When your know-it-all ‘friend’ tells you about how mediation is a waste of time.

Art Aingel was surprised when his friend Draco DeVille invited him golfing at the country club. Art, of late, had been running around like a college kid, getting the letters “L-I-V-E” and “F-R-E-E” tattooed on his knuckles and spending most nights in his young girlfriend’s Highlands bungalow she shared with four roommates. With each week that passed after Draco’s wife filed for divorce, Draco seemed to be getting less mature, going backward in time like Benjamin Button. Continue reading “12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: Step 9 – Mediation”

The Future of Family Law: Pairing Mediation & Unbundled Services

andersen law pc courtroom

Your divorce, support and parental responsibilities cases involve the most critical issues in your life: your family, your finances and your future. And yet 75 percent of parties in the first judicial district do not have an attorney in their domestic relations case. This is akin to wandering into a hospital to perform surgery by yourself with no assistance.

What will you do when you cannot get a piece of evidence admitted? When you do not how to read and distinguish case law? When the opposing party’s attorney or the judge or mediator asks you a legal question and you have no idea what they are talking about? Terrible results can happen, including an unenforceable parenting agreement or a financial mistake that costs thousands.

Mediation alone will not solve this, but if you have an unbundled lawyer “on call,” you may be able to respond quickly and knowledgeably. My retainer is $500 for unbundled services. I can attend mediation with you or stand by on the telephone, giving advice as needed. Call me to discuss this affordable, creative option.

 

Though Helpful, a Mediator Does Not Replace a Lawyer in Divorce Proceedings

Mediation can be an excellent way to make progress and, ideally, resolve your divorce proceeding. In an era when the courts are overrun with divorces and have little time to address critical issues about your family and finances, mediation gives you more control over results.

However, a mediator does NOT replace an attorney.  A mediator CANNOT give legal advice or tell you whether the agreement you are signing is fair to you.

That is where a family law attorney like myself comes in to the picture. At the very least, I can review the separation and parenting time agreements before you sign them to make sure they protect your interests. In addition, I can advise you as to negotiation strategies and even participate in the mediation session to ensure you are making the correct legal arguments to optimize your results.  I also am very specific about the excellent mediators I refer for each case and client. That choice can make a huge difference and I know the mediators who will work best for you.

Mediation and legal representation can work together like hand and glove. Do not neglect mediation, but do not forget to protect yourself with a lawyer’s critical advice. Usually you cannot afford NOT to know your rights.

What is Family Law?

Because attorneys practice so many types of law, it can be confusing to know which type of lawyer you need. Many people think that Family Law attorneys like myself only assist clients with divorce, but that is a myth. The truth is that divorces are far from the only thing I do.

Family Law includes several types of cases, such as:

  • prenuptial agreements (also called prenups)
  • postnuptial agreements (also called postnups)
  • cohabitation agreements
  • legal separations
  • annulments
  • mediation
  • adoptions including step parent adoptions
  • parenting time
  • maintenance (also called alimony or spousal support)
  • division of property
  • child support
  • civil unions
  • allocation of parental responsibilities
  • dependency and neglect proceedings
  • contempt
  • protection orders
  • post-decree issues
  • enforcement of court orders
  • relocations
  • grandparent proceedings
  • guardianships

Basically, any type of legal issue a family may have is “Family Law,” just what it sounds like in the name. The above are all Family Law cases I handle. If you or someone you know is in need of Family Law representation in the Greater Denver area, please have them contact me.