Access Free Legal Conference Each Week

If you’re familiar with my practice, you know that I strongly believe in everyone having affordable access to legal advice and receiving as much or as little help as they want in a case. It is in that spirit that I offer unbundled – a la carte – legal services in addition to full legal representation, allowing the client to determine how much they will have my assistance. It’s also in this spirit that I offer the option of legal advice provided virtually through video chat. Read More »

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12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: THE BASICS – Step 2 – Response to Petition for Dissolution

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog will spell out the 12 steps of divorce.

The following is a roadmap with the basics for 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. The intent is to walk you through the process a simple step at a time.

(To see the process in a more personalized, real world context, follow the blogs on the Aingel and DeVille families: the Aingels relatively soaring through the process while the DeVilles crash and burn.)

 And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me at 720-922-3880 or email beth@andersenlawpc.com with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult.

Here is where the year will take us:

January – serving and filing a petition for dissolution

February – responding to the petition Read More »

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How Do I Get the Court to Write an Order?

When a party wants the court to order the other party (or both parties) to do something, she must first make a motion with the court, explaining why she wants what she wants, what the facts are, what law applies, and how she wants it enforced. 2.8.17.Andersen.Order

There are a few ways to do this. The judicial website has several forms in its library that apply to various situations. The court likes parties to use these JDF forms when petitioning the court to take an action. The forms include a motion (asking the court to do something) and a proposed order (which the judge would sign if he agrees with the motion). If the judge signs the proposed order, it becomes enforceable by the court. Read More »

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How to Become a Notary in Colorado

Ever thought of becoming a notary? Here are the steps necessary to becoming one in Colorado. Notaries are regulated by the Colorado Secretary of State, so first click here to go the website. You will find a checklist of documents you will need before you can register with the Secretary of State. How to Become a Notary in Colorado - Andersen Law PC

These include:

  1. An affirmation signed by you in front of a notary. This form is provided on the website.
  2. Copy of an ID card, such as a driver’s license.
  3. Non-U.S. citizens must supply a permanent resident card or Employment Authorization Document (EAD) card.
  4. Training certificate from a state-approved trainer, issued in the last six months.
  5. Exam certificate.

To qualify to become a notary you must:

  • Be a Colorado resident.
  • Be 18 years of age or older.
  • Be able to read and write the English language.
  • Have Colorado addresses and telephone numbers for business and residence.
  • Never have had a notary commission revoked.
  • Never have been convicted of a felony or in the past five years, a misdemeanor involving dishonesty.

The Secretary of State offers online training and certification free through its e-learning notary training course, found here. You will be required to set up an account. Once you’ve enrolled, you can begin studying the free materials. You will find six modules to study. The estimated time of completion is a little over two hours. Once you’ve done this, you will be able to print your training certificate. Or you can take the training in a classroom. Click here for that information.

If you don’t want to use the secretary of state’s training class, you can go through an outside vendor. A list of approved training classes can be found here. Some of these are classroom setting, online, or a combination of the two.

Once you have finished your training, you need to take the exam. You will take that on the Secretary of State’s website, the link to which you can find here. Once you have passed the exam, you will be able to print completion certificate. You will take this and the other documents listed above and upload them to the Secretary of State website. Once you’re at the website, you’ll log in, submit the documents online and then wait for notification by email. Once you’ve received approval via email, you’ll print your commission certificate, obtain an official notary seal and a journal, and you are ready to begin notarizing!

Some of the training class vendors include the notary seal and journal with their course. Otherwise, you can find them at office supply stores like Office Depot.

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12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: THE BASICS – Step 1 – File for Petition of Dissolution

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog will spell out the 12 steps of divorce.

The following is a roadmap with the basics for 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. The intent is to walk you through the process a simple step at a time.

(To see the process in a more personalized, real world context, follow the blogs on the Aingel and DeVille families: the Aingels relatively soaring through the process while the DeVilles crash and burn.)

 And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me at 720-922-3880 or email beth@andersenlawpc.com with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult.

Here is where the year will take us:

January – serving and filing a petition for dissolution

February – responding to the petition

March – sworn financial statement, disclosures, and parenting classes

April – initial status conference

May – discovery and depositions

June – professionals:  CFI, PRE, vocational evaluator, appraisals

July – motions to compel and telephone conferences

August – temporary orders

September – mediation

October – parenting plans and separation agreements

November – witnesses, pretrial deadlines and permanent orders

December – QDROs and other post decree issues

 

JANUARY: How to File a Petition for Dissolution

If you decide to file for divorce in Colorado, follow these steps. The good news is that you can find the forms online yourself at the Colorado Judicial websiteRead More »

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Mothers’ Rights, Fathers’ Rights — What’s Right?

I am sure there are some firms who, starting back in the days of Kramer v. Kramer, wanted to protect fathers. What to Know Before Seeking a "Father's Rights" Law Firm - Andersen Law PC Beth Andersen

However, I personally think that several firms called themselves “fathers’ rights” as a marketing device because the father is usually the higher breadwinner.

Not every client is satisfied by the big firm who advertises on sports radio proclaiming fathers’ rights. I handle MANY cases that came from the so-called fathers’ rights firms who charged outrageously high fees, and then the clients were tapped out and weren’t even divorced yet. The label did them no good. Read More »

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How to Sign a Document Using ‘Power of Attorney’

Andersen Law PC - How to sign a document as agent pursuant to power of attorneyA financial or medical power of attorney is a legal document where one person (the “principal”) grants another person (the “agent”) the “power of attorney” to act on the principal’s behalf in certain cases. For example, a principal could grant an agent the power to act on their behalf, e.g.: withdraw money, sell property, etc. It’s important to have someone you trust as your agent under power of attorney, because this power generally starts immediately and not just once you are incapacitated.

If you have been granted the power of attorney, you may have to sign documents on the principal’s behalf. Colorado law does not specify how this signature must appear, but various organizations have listed the minimum requirements of signing while using your granted power of attorney: Read More »

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What Not to Post on Social Media After a Divorce

Social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have changed our world and caused people to evaluate how private they want to be and what they want to share with the world or extended friends and family via the Internet. But many people also post to social media without giving a second thought to who can see what they’re posting and whether it’s a good idea to put that post out there. 12.12.16.What Not to Post on Facebook After Divorce. Andersen Law PC. Beth Andersen

It is more important than ever to show a level of restraint in social media posts when you’re involved in a divorce, as what you post can come back to hurt you over the process and even directly impact your settlement and child custody, or you may find yourself hauled into court.

Here are several actions and types of social media posts I’ve seen in real cases that you should make sure to avoid copying as you go through your divorce and after. Read More »

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Think You Don’t Know Anyone With Family Law Issues? Think Again.

As families come together for the holidays, there is the false reality of TV commercials where everyone is bathed in a glowing light toasting their good fortune. Even friends and relations seem to have it together as they boast about their perfect lives on Facebook. family dinner andersen law pc beth andersen

But then you really think about it and realize that when you think of the people you know best, you know that their lives and families aren’t actually “perfect.” Every couple and family has their own sets of issues and struggles unique to them, some more serious than others.

Maybe your family is fortunate to be close-knit, and you think you don’t know anyone with family law issues. However, the facts are that family law issues affect more than one in two families. So even if you don’t have those issues, you definitely do know someone else dealing with them. Read More »

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Looking for Long-Term Care: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

There are several steps you can take to make sure that you are not making a decision about a long-term care (nursing home or assisted living) placement for your loved one or yourself at the last minute. It’s important to look around ahead of time, consider long-term care insurance and get in-home care before that fateful broken hip or other accident occurs.

11-14-16-andersenlaw-long-term-care-facilities

However, if you do end up in that precarious position, a hospital discharge about to occur, you may end up facing the “bad” or the “ugly” side of placement. For example, the hospital may push rushed placement into a subpar facility. Some of these have low rankings, insufficient nursing care, understaffed Alzheimer’s wings warehousing over-medicated individuals in rows of wheelchairs.

If you think I am exaggerating for effect, I am not. I was privileged to work at the Community Support Services unit of MFY Legal Services in New York. This agency successfully brought proceedings against adult homes labeled “hell homes” by the New York Times due to horrors such as bedsores, rat bites, insufficient food and unexplained deaths.

On the other hand, Colorado has wonderful facilities full of loving and skilled care.

Here are some things to look for in order to get the GOOD without the BAD and the UGLY.  Read More »

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