Will You Please Help Me Support Business Owners in Need?

The disastrous floods of 2013 prompted action in Evergreen, the community that my children and I have called home for so many years. Between the flooding and almost yearly fires that have forced my family and many other families and business owners to flee, it became clear that our community members regularly need support. Evergreen Chamber Disaster Fund presents check to Evergreen resident.

That was when I worked with others in the area to launch the nonprofit organization, the Evergreen Chamber Disaster Fund. The fund raises money to be distributed to business owners in times of need, whether due to natural disasters or personal hardships like illnesses. In the picture to the right, Penny Randall is shown with Evergreen Chamber of Commerce President Betsy Hays, fund board members Bruce Anderson and Linda Castle, and Evergreen Fire Inspector Dan Hrouda as she receives a check from the fund after losing her home in a fire.

This is a cause close to my heart, which is why I will again be participating in the Evergreen Rotary’s annual 100 Holes of Golf on Thursday, June 15, along with my fellow board members. We would love it if you would support our team with a donation.

As some of you know, I am getting married on July 1. In lieu of gifts, I ask that you please sponsor me in the 100 Holes of Golf. I’ll be accepting donations benefitting the Evergreen Chamber Disaster Fund through July 31.

You can make a donation here or by sending a check – made payable to “Evergreen Chamber Community Fund” – directly to me: Andersen Law PC, 12712 W. Ken Caryl Ave., Littleton, CO 80127.

Thank you in advance for your support! The residents and business owners of Evergreen and I greatly appreciate it!

Sincerely,
Beth Andersen

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Cross-Examination for Non-Attorneys: How to Do It and How to Respond to It

 

Andersen Law PC does both unbundled representation of clients who do not have full-service attorneys and also full service representation where we are attorneys of record who do everything. Both scenarios involve cross-examination if a hearing happens. How to do Cross-Examination for Non-Attorneys

With unbundled representation, you may choose to do a hearing by yourself without an attorney there to represent you.

But even with full service, you may have an attorney or the other party (usually your former spouse or partner) cross-examine you.

In both cases, there are rules, principles and tips to keep in mind.

A law professor named Irving Younger came up with ten commandments of cross-examination. They are a good place to start.

  1. BE BRIEF: When asking your questions, make your points and be done. You are limited to the matters raised during the direct examination, and there is no reason to repeat all of those issues. Choose the main ones that make a point about the PROOF YOU NEED TO PROVE YOUR CASE.One of the most common fallacies of law is that you will win your case if you “catch the other person in a lie.” Not necessarily. The court needs to look at all the elements of the legal issue and see how the facts fit into it. So, for example, if the court is trying to decide the best interests of the child, they want to know about factors like whether you both can spend time with the child and whether you both can put the child’s interests ahead of your own. If you catch the other party lying about whether they quit their job or were fired, the judge may not care as long as they are a great parent. On the other hand, it may affect child support if the person is saying they cannot find work. Different issues, different factors.

    When responding to cross, be brief. “Yes.” “No.” “I don’t know.” “I don’t understand the question.” You can explain your answers later on redirect.

  1. USE SHORT QUESTIONS AND PLAIN WORDS: It helps if everyone understands what you are asking. In fact, whether cross-examining or answering, it is pretty easy to confuse yourself (as well as the judge and other people in the courtroom) if you go on too long in asking or answering questions.
  1. ALWAYS ASK LEADING QUESTIONS: A leading question is the opposite of an open-ended question. A leading question has the answer built into it. It does not give the witness any wiggle room to get out of the answer.Here are some leading questions. They are good for cross-examination (in fact, they are so good at leading the witness to the answer that you are NOT allowed to use them with your own sympathetic witnesses).

    – You have not paid child support this month, isn’t that true?

    – You sent the other parent five texts saying, “Never text me again.” Isn’t that correct?

    – You did not appear at the last hearing, did you?

    By contrast, open-ended questions start with who, what, where, which, when, how, why, explain, etc. While great for your own sympathetic witnesses, they are NOT good for cross-examination. They open the door to long-winded testimony and the witness wiggling out of what you want them to say.

    – When did you last pay child support?

    – How much child support did you pay?

    – How often do you text the other party?

and, worst of all 
– Why did you do it?

  1. DON’T ASK A QUESTION TO WHICH YOU DO NOT KNOW THE ANSWER: I think this speaks for itself. Follow it. Do your homework BEFORE the hearing and not through a fishing expedition at hearing. You may not like what comes up at the end of your hook!
  1. LISTEN TO THE WITNESS’ ANSWERS: I take notes during the cross so I know what to use later and what to use in a closing argument. Don’t just read through your questions to get it over with. Pay attention. If you are representing yourself, you may want a person who is not a witness to sit in the courtroom (not at your table as that is not allowed) to take notes for you.
  1. DON’T QUARREL WITH THE WITNESS: Attorneys are accused of badgering if they do this. For non-attorneys, it does not help you and it wastes time. You are not allowed to testify as part of cross-examination. You are only there to ask good questions and live with the answers as they come. If it is not responsive, you can ask the judge to strike the answer as non-responsive. If the witness is being obnoxious and refusing to answer, you can ask the judge to instruct them to answer responsively. But arguing does not help.Especially in a domestic violence case where you are the accused or the victim, do not do this. It makes the accused look like a bully and it makes the victim look like a bully (not a victim) too. Courts definitely look at the behavior of parties when they act as their own attorney and cross-examine the other party. I have heard judges say that they find it very revealing.

    As a witness, do not quarrel for the same reasons.

  1. DON’T ALLOW THE WITNESS TO REPEAT DIRECT TESTIMONY: Leading questions prevent this. And, as mentioned in No. 6 above, you can ask the court for help if the witness is not responsive.As a witness, you may want to touch on some direct testimony, but there is no need to waste a lot of time on it. You already made these points.
  1. DON’T ALLOW THE WITNESS TO EXPLAIN ANSWERS: Leading questions prevent this. And, as mentioned in No. 6 above, you can ask the court for help if the witness is not responsive.As a witness, remember that you can explain on redirect.
  1. DON’T ASK THE ‘ONE QUESTION TOO MANY’: This is law school trial advocacy 101. We all learn it in law school. Here is how it goes: You went to the house, didn’t you? You opened the front door, didn’t you? Yes. You picked up the revolver, didn’t you? Yes. You aimed it at him, isn’t that right? Yes. You pulled the trigger, didn’t you? Yes. He fell down, didn’t he? Yes. He was later pronounced dead, isn’t that right? Yes.Okay, that is enough. You asked just the right number of questions and leave it at that. Let the judge connect the dots and make the FINAL CONCLUSION. Do NOT ask the next question.

    Oops, you didn’t listen. You just had to go on and ask ONE QUESTION TOO MANY: You killed him, didn’t you? NO. And now you opened the door to: he died later for another reason, he was already bleeding when I got there, I do not know why he died, I did not mean to kill him and I was defending myself, he was already on the floor when I got there, there were a lot of bullets flying and I am not sure, he was lunging at me — aaaugh! One question too many. Do not ask it.

    A similar point for witnesses is not to open the door to new issues on cross. A good attorney may ask you something just to open the door to a new issue, knowing you will get defensive and go into a whole new topic. Be careful what you answer and what you volunteer on cross just as is done on direct.

  1. SAVE THE ULTIMATE POINT OF YOUR CROSS FOR YOUR SUMMATION:This goes hand in hand with not asking one question too many. Let the judge connect the dots and make the conclusion at the end. And you are going to help the judge do this, if closing statements are allowed, by emphasizing that conclusion based on the law at the end.As a witness, you also want to let the judge connect the dots. You do not need to testify to legal issues. It can get confusing when you are acting as your own attorney but remember that when you are on the witness stand, you are testifying to facts. When you open or close your case with a statement to the court, you are connecting the dots.

    In parenting cases, I find it helpful if you keep a picture of your child or children on the stand with you during the other party’s cross-examination of you. Remember why you are there.

Good luck. Stay calm and do not lie, cloud the truth, curse, name call, get angry or be sarcastic. That never helps. The court is looking to see if you are reasonable. Acting reasonable during cross-examination is a great way to show that you are reasonable outside the courtroom as well.

For more information on how to handle cross-examinations, contact Andersen Law PC today at beth@andersenlawpc.com or 720-922-3880.

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Where Does My Property Go If I Die Without a Will?

If you die without a will, your property goes where the state tells it to go. Being will-less is called being “intestate.” Each state has its own intestacy statutes that determine what happens to your estate when you have no will. What happens to my property if I don't have a will? Andersen Law PC explains

However, not all property is covered by these statutes (or included in a will if you have one). This property will transfer to whoever you name as beneficiary or to a surviving co-owner. This includes proceeds from a life insurance policy, property you have already transferred to a trust, retirement account funds, such as 401(k)s or IRAs, property owned in joint tenancy with someone else, real estate held by beneficiary deed or by transfer-on-death, payable-on-death bank accounts, and securities held in a transfer-on-death account. Read More »

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Access Free Legal Conference Each Week

If you’re familiar with my practice, you know that I strongly believe in everyone having affordable access to legal advice and receiving as much or as little help as they want in a case. It is in that spirit that I offer unbundled – a la carte – legal services in addition to full legal representation, allowing the client to determine how much they will have my assistance. It’s also in this spirit that I offer the option of legal advice provided virtually through video chat. Read More »

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12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: THE BASICS – Step 2 – Response to Petition for Dissolution

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog will spell out the 12 steps of divorce.

The following is a roadmap with the basics for 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. The intent is to walk you through the process a simple step at a time.

(To see the process in a more personalized, real world context, follow the blogs on the Aingel and DeVille families: the Aingels relatively soaring through the process while the DeVilles crash and burn.)

 And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me at 720-922-3880 or email beth@andersenlawpc.com with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult.

Here is where the year will take us:

January – serving and filing a petition for dissolution

February – responding to the petition Read More »

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How Do I Get the Court to Write an Order?

When a party wants the court to order the other party (or both parties) to do something, she must first make a motion with the court, explaining why she wants what she wants, what the facts are, what law applies, and how she wants it enforced. 2.8.17.Andersen.Order

There are a few ways to do this. The judicial website has several forms in its library that apply to various situations. The court likes parties to use these JDF forms when petitioning the court to take an action. The forms include a motion (asking the court to do something) and a proposed order (which the judge would sign if he agrees with the motion). If the judge signs the proposed order, it becomes enforceable by the court. Read More »

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How to Become a Notary in Colorado

Ever thought of becoming a notary? Here are the steps necessary to becoming one in Colorado. Notaries are regulated by the Colorado Secretary of State, so first click here to go the website. You will find a checklist of documents you will need before you can register with the Secretary of State. How to Become a Notary in Colorado - Andersen Law PC

These include:

  1. An affirmation signed by you in front of a notary. This form is provided on the website.
  2. Copy of an ID card, such as a driver’s license.
  3. Non-U.S. citizens must supply a permanent resident card or Employment Authorization Document (EAD) card.
  4. Training certificate from a state-approved trainer, issued in the last six months.
  5. Exam certificate.

To qualify to become a notary you must:

  • Be a Colorado resident.
  • Be 18 years of age or older.
  • Be able to read and write the English language.
  • Have Colorado addresses and telephone numbers for business and residence.
  • Never have had a notary commission revoked.
  • Never have been convicted of a felony or in the past five years, a misdemeanor involving dishonesty.

The Secretary of State offers online training and certification free through its e-learning notary training course, found here. You will be required to set up an account. Once you’ve enrolled, you can begin studying the free materials. You will find six modules to study. The estimated time of completion is a little over two hours. Once you’ve done this, you will be able to print your training certificate. Or you can take the training in a classroom. Click here for that information.

If you don’t want to use the secretary of state’s training class, you can go through an outside vendor. A list of approved training classes can be found here. Some of these are classroom setting, online, or a combination of the two.

Once you have finished your training, you need to take the exam. You will take that on the Secretary of State’s website, the link to which you can find here. Once you have passed the exam, you will be able to print completion certificate. You will take this and the other documents listed above and upload them to the Secretary of State website. Once you’re at the website, you’ll log in, submit the documents online and then wait for notification by email. Once you’ve received approval via email, you’ll print your commission certificate, obtain an official notary seal and a journal, and you are ready to begin notarizing!

Some of the training class vendors include the notary seal and journal with their course. Otherwise, you can find them at office supply stores like Office Depot.

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12 STEPS OF DIVORCE: THE BASICS – Step 1 – File for Petition of Dissolution

Each month for one year, the Andersen Law PC blog will spell out the 12 steps of divorce.

The following is a roadmap with the basics for 12 steps of a divorce proceeding. The intent is to walk you through the process a simple step at a time.

(To see the process in a more personalized, real world context, follow the blogs on the Aingel and DeVille families: the Aingels relatively soaring through the process while the DeVilles crash and burn.)

 And if you want to divorce in less than a year, feel free to call me at 720-922-3880 or email beth@andersenlawpc.com with questions specific to your situation. I am happy to walk you through your own next steps and to answer questions in your complimentary initial phone or videoconference consult.

Here is where the year will take us:

January – serving and filing a petition for dissolution

February – responding to the petition

March – sworn financial statement, disclosures, and parenting classes

April – initial status conference

May – discovery and depositions

June – professionals:  CFI, PRE, vocational evaluator, appraisals

July – motions to compel and telephone conferences

August – temporary orders

September – mediation

October – parenting plans and separation agreements

November – witnesses, pretrial deadlines and permanent orders

December – QDROs and other post decree issues

 

JANUARY: How to File a Petition for Dissolution

If you decide to file for divorce in Colorado, follow these steps. The good news is that you can find the forms online yourself at the Colorado Judicial websiteRead More »

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Mothers’ Rights, Fathers’ Rights — What’s Right?

I am sure there are some firms who, starting back in the days of Kramer v. Kramer, wanted to protect fathers. What to Know Before Seeking a "Father's Rights" Law Firm - Andersen Law PC Beth Andersen

However, I personally think that several firms called themselves “fathers’ rights” as a marketing device because the father is usually the higher breadwinner.

Not every client is satisfied by the big firm who advertises on sports radio proclaiming fathers’ rights. I handle MANY cases that came from the so-called fathers’ rights firms who charged outrageously high fees, and then the clients were tapped out and weren’t even divorced yet. The label did them no good. Read More »

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How to Sign a Document Using ‘Power of Attorney’

Andersen Law PC - How to sign a document as agent pursuant to power of attorneyA financial or medical power of attorney is a legal document where one person (the “principal”) grants another person (the “agent”) the “power of attorney” to act on the principal’s behalf in certain cases. For example, a principal could grant an agent the power to act on their behalf, e.g.: withdraw money, sell property, etc. It’s important to have someone you trust as your agent under power of attorney, because this power generally starts immediately and not just once you are incapacitated.

If you have been granted the power of attorney, you may have to sign documents on the principal’s behalf. Colorado law does not specify how this signature must appear, but various organizations have listed the minimum requirements of signing while using your granted power of attorney: Read More »

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