How to Do A Court Hearing For Your Divorce

Hospitals do not let people show up and do medical procedures on their kids.  If you are closing on a house, your mortgage company will not let you do your own title search; you have to hire a title insurance company to do it.  You cannot drive a car or own certain weapons without training and a license.

But guess what you can do?  Waltz into court and handle the hearing on your divorce without any training much less a license to practice law.  This is something people with years of education and training find challenging.  I am tempted to say, “Good luck with that.”

Except a huge percentage of people do have to do this in order to protect their family, finances and future.

Here are tips for how to do a court hearing for your divorce.

      1. Do NOT procrastinate.  Make a “to do” list and calendar deadlines right away.  The court issues a case management order that tells you what to do and when.  Read and obey it.  If you are not good at paperwork, find someone who is to help you stay on track.  Courts do not like to give continuances to extend these hearings, so just get ready and get it over with on time.
      2. Find your TOP THREE arguments for hearing.  It will go fast and you will not have time to argue every single thing. Instead, start with your top priority.  I suggest that parents start with parental responsibilities, which means parenting time and decision-making, because this is usually their first concern.  Financial issues are pretty easy to triage: the more money at stake, the more priority.  I am not saying you will not get to other issues, but prioritization is key. Have a timer at hearing to make sure you stay on track to get to the most important issues.
      3. You need certain items for hearing. Bring witness disclosures, four trial notebooks, and a joint trial management certificate prepared with your spouse or his or her attorney if they have one.
      4. Look up the law on point, including basic rules of evidence.  You can do this and there are people available to help you. The courts have self-help clerks who are amazing and they often have training clinics or “ask an attorney” days.

     

For a fast, easy and free consult, call me with your paper and pen in hand.  I will go over the facts of your case and give a list of personalized tips.  I do this every day and love it, and I am happy to help point you in the right direction.  Call Andersen Law PC at 720-922-3880 or my cell phone at 303-808-4794 and I will call you back as soon as I can for your free consult.